Go Native

rsz_muddy_river

Landscaping with natives is an easy yet very effective way to be Stream Smart at your home or business. When you grow plants in the appropriate conditions they thrive with a lot less work. By choosing native plants well adapted to our valley you’ll save time and money, reduce maintenance, prevent pests and diseases, and leave more water in our streams for salmon and other uses. Besides being beautiful, they’re drought tolerant and naturally resistant to pesky insects. This means they don’t need much water, pesticides, or fertilizers, so planting them will reduce the amount of hazardous chemicals in our fragile waterways

Kinnikinnick
Kinnikinnick

If you already have them, leaving native plants to grow along streams or rivers is the best practice. But if you have grass or ornamentals by the water, then landscaping with natives will help restore vital riparian zones, which in turn will help rivers, streams and wildlife thrive. So if your grass grows right to a river or stream, then consider removing it and replacing with drought tolerant, native shrubs and trees that will create attractive shady areas while offering wildlife some healthy habitat. If they could, the animals and fish would thank you for “going native!”

Dogwood
Dogwood

Resources

Several local nurseries specialize in native plants:
Plant Oregon, The Nursery on Wagner Creek
Forest Farm at Pacifica
Shooting Star Nursery

A great native plant list with pictures, for a variety of soil types – Native Plants

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